Boren Scholarship - Pitt Campus Process

Boren Scholars study less-commonly taught languages in world regions critical to U.S. national security interests. Previous language study is NOT required. In exchange for funding, Boren Scholars commit to working in the federal government for at least one year after undergraduate or graduate school. US Citizenship is required. 

National Scholarship Program Manager, Shannon Mischler, sjm130@pitt.edu, (412) 624-0587

PDF copy of Boren Scholarship 2017 - Pitt Campus Process (Last two pages should be given to your letter writers)

IMPORTANT DATES - MARK YOUR CALENDAR

December 1st - FIRST campus deadline - submit completed application online. Note that we expect your two essays to be rough at this point. We will unsubmit applications immediately after we review them.

January 6th - SECOND campus deadline - submit completed application on the Boren online application system.

--all components EXCEPT recommendation letters should be submitted online

--recommendation letters should be EMAILED ONLY to Judy Zang (jaz36@pitt.edu). 

January 16th through 26th

--Boren campus interviews

--only after receiving a go-ahead from a national scholarships advisor (Shannon, Ian Riggins, or Judy), enter LOR writer names/contacts info in the Boren application system

February 2nd - FINAL CAMPUS DEADLINE. Submit completed application online for the last time.

February 2nd through February 9th - National Scholarships office prepares the Boren campus evaluation for each applicant; submits application to the Boren Program.

 

OCTOBER

• Thoroughly read Boren website. Read EVERY LINK under Boren Scholarship.

• Register immediately online at https://nsep.iieweb.net/nsep/nseplogin.asp to receive all relevant communication about the award and campus process from Pitt’s Boren campus representative, UHC National Scholarship Advising.

• Register for Boren webinar http://www.borenawards.org/webinars.html. These are very helpful.

• Line up recommendation writers. Prepare packet described here on Tips & Advice, http://www.honorscollege.pitt.edu/scholarships/national-scholarships-advising/tips-advice. INCLUDE THE BOREN GUIDELINES WITHIN THE PACKET (page 2 and 3 of this document).

• Tell recommendation writers NOT to finish the letter until they see draft of your Boren essays (give them solid draft of your essays later in November).

• Find a faculty mentor with expertise in the country and/or topic of your national security interests. Arrange to meet with them to discuss the first Boren essay. Have them give you feedback when you have a solid draft prepared.

• Choose study abroad program(s) that meet Boren language requirements AND length of time. Make sure the program(s) is Pitt approved (check with Office of Study Abroad) .

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NOVEMBER

• Meet with faculty mentor/expert in field to discuss national security topics for essay; make additional appointment for later in November to go over essay drafts.

• Take application essays to Pitt Writing Center before appointment with National Scholarship Advisors.

• Go over application minimum of two times before December deadline with an advisor. Please schedule those appointments well in advance. Go to http://www.appointmentquest.com/scheduler/2160041238

• Give LOR writers a copy of your essays once you have a solid draft of them. This is the second installation of the recommendation packet that you gave to them previously.

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DECEMBER 1st: FIRST CAMPUS DEADLINE

• Complete application is due EXCEPT for Recommendation Letters. See http://www.borenawards.org/boren_scholarship/how_apply.html for checklist of all materials.

• Submit your application online (DO NOT WORRY, it only goes to the campus rep, NOT to the Boren Program). We will unsubmit it to you so you can make revisions before the second--and final-- campus deadline (February 2nd).

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JANUARY 6, 2017: LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION ARE DUE

• Minimum of two letters, may include three. See Boren website for details.

• LOR letters are to emailed to Judy Zang at jaz36@pitt.edu.

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JANUARY 16-26, 2017 BOREN CAMPUS INTERVIEWS

FEBRUARY 2, 2017 by 5 PM FINAL CAMPUS DEADLINE Applicants submit FINAL application online.

FEBRUARY 2nd through 9th, 2017 - National Scholarships office prepares the Boren campus evaluation for each applicant; submit applications to the Boren Program.

MID MAY BOREN RESULTS ANNOUNCED 

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GUIDELINES FOR BOREN SCHOLARSHIP LOR WRITERS

INCLUDE THESE TWO PAGES IN THE RECOMMENDATION PACKET THAT YOU GIVE TO YOUR WRITERS!

FOCUS OF AWARD AND YOUR LETTER

--The Boren Scholarship for international study is a highly competitive award with three main emphases: language acquisition, cultural immersion, and national security. These three components are extremely important in the student’s application. A competitive applicant must clearly articulate how increasing their familiarity with the host country’s culture and language will strengthen U.S. security and ties between the U.S. and that country. Note that national security is broadly defined—more details on following page.

--The candidate should also demonstrate their qualifications for this specific award in two contexts: 1) their academic and extracurricular backgrounds, and 2) their educational and professional goals and how that connects to the Boren experience. In your letters it is helpful to include not only your familiarity with their work and background, but concrete details and examples whenever possible when commenting on their accomplishments, potential, and character.

--Note that it is perfectly okay if the student has little or no previous knowledge of the language as long as they 1) provide a strong reason for beginning this language, and 2) demonstrate how they will continue language study after the Boren experience.

LOR DEADLINE – January 6th, 2017

LOR INSTRUCTIONS

--Your student was instructed to provide you with a recommendation packet to assist you in writing the letter. The packet should include these Boren Scholarship guidelines, unofficial transcripts, updated resume, their suggested items to include in your letter, and succinct description of their reason and goals behind their pursuit of this particular award.

--Please read the student’s application before completing your letter. They will give it to you as a second installment to the initial packet described above as soon as they have a solid draft of their essays later in November. Any feedback you provide the student on their essays will be helpful.

--Final letters (on letterhead) should be emailed to Judy Zang at jaz36@pitt.edu by January 6th.

CAMPUS PROCESS

--Boren requests that all scholarship applicants undergo a campus interview. This is NOT a selection process; it is an opportunity for the institution (PITT) to give the student objective feedback on the application, and to provide Boren with an evaluation and rating of each candidate.

--If you are interested in participating on a campus evaluation committee for this award, please contact Judy Zang. Interviews will be conducted January 16th through 26th.  

From the Boren website, http://www.borenawards.org/boren_scholarship:

Boren Scholarships provide up to $20,000 to U.S. undergraduate students to study abroad in areas of the world that are critical to U.S. interests and underrepresented in study abroad, including Africa, Asia, Central & Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East. The countries of Western Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand are excluded.

Boren Scholars represent a variety of academic backgrounds, but all are interested in studying less commonly taught languages, including but not limited to Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Swahili.

Boren Scholarships are funded by the National Security Education Program (NSEP), which focuses on geographic areas, languages, and fields of study deemed critical to U.S. national security. Applicants should identify how their study abroad program, as well as their future academic and career goals, will contribute to U.S. national security, broadly defined. NSEP draws on a broad definition of national security, recognizing that the scope of national security has expanded to include not only the traditional concerns of protecting and promoting American well-being, but also the challenges of global society, including sustainable development, environmental degradation, global disease and hunger, population growth and migration, and economic competitiveness.